How A Boat Is Made — Nautique Factory Tour

I’ve been fortunate enough to be able to go behind the scenes at a lot of boat and PWC factories and see how things are built. I’ve visited the massive Bayliner plant in Mexico, Chris Craft in Florida, Sea Ray in Tennessee, Caravelle in Georgia, Tige in Texas, Sea-Doo in Quebec, Kawasaki in Nebraska…the list goes on and on.   One that always stood out, however, was the former Nautique assembly line in Orlando.   Why? Because, until recently, it was a modern boat-building operation stuck in the heart of old-school Orlando, requiring multiple buildings over several city blocks to get things done from ...

3rd December 2009.
By Jeff Hemmel

I’ve been fortunate enough to be able to go behind the scenes at a lot of boat and PWC factories and see how things are built. I’ve visited the massive Bayliner plant in Mexico, Chris Craft in Florida, Sea Ray in Tennessee, Caravelle in Georgia, Tige in Texas, Sea-Doo in Quebec, Kawasaki in Nebraska…the list goes on and on.

 

One that always stood out, however, was the former Nautique assembly line in Orlando.

 

Why? Because, until recently, it was a modern boat-building operation stuck in the heart of old-school Orlando, requiring multiple buildings over several city blocks to get things done from start to finish. That’s all now changed. Nautiques are now built in a new, 217,000-square foot, state-of-the-art facility in O-Town. Nautique wakeboard pro Shaun Murray leads a video tour of the process here.

 

For those who have never seen how a boat is built, it’s kind of fun to follow along. Of course, the video doesn’t include the realities of a real tour…like leaving with a fresh coat of fiberglass on the bottom of your shoes, or that delightful smell of styrene invading your nostrils.

 

Live near a PWC or boat manufacturer? Call ‘em up. Chances are they give tours of their own.

 


About the author:

Jeff Hemmel

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Jeff Hemmel writes for boats.com, Boating, PersonalWatercraft.com, and Powersports Business. The former Senior Editor at Watercraft World, Jeff is a multi-time award winner as well as a 2008 inductee into the IJSBA Hall of Fame. His first book, "The Anti-Pirate Potato Cannon...and 101 Other Things For Young Mariners To Try, Do, & Build On the Water," received a bronze medal in the 2010 Moonbeam Children's Book Awards. For more info, visit Jeff Hemmel's website.

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