Rigging a rail-mounted cutting board.

I was perusing photos yesterday, looking for a good shot to go along with an article I’m working on for a magazine, when I came across this picture: Though the focus is on Max and his first spadefish – caught on a clam bit at the wreck of the Marine Electric, 12 miles from the Ocean [...]

29th January 2010.
By Lenny Rudow

I was perusing photos yesterday, looking for a good shot to go along with an article I’m working on for a magazine, when I came across this picture:

Max man, with a spadefish. (I added the red arrow, you'll see why in a sec.)

Max man, with a spadefish. (I added the red arrow, you'll see why in a sec.)

Though the focus is on Max and his first spadefish – caught on a clam bit at the wreck of the Marine Electric, 12 miles from the Ocean City inlet – what we need to focus on today is the cutting board in this shot. This one, I must admit, was mounted on Writeaway before I even acquired the boat. Though I like to do my own rigging, I left the board in place because it serves its purpose well. Better, in fact, then other cutting boards I’ve rigged up in the past. I’ve had ‘em on rodholder mounts, but that stinks because you lose the use of one of your rodholders, they’re big and clunky, and tough to stow. I’ve had ‘em mounted on top of coolers, which works great until someone sits down on the cooler without looking first. Not only do they get bait-butt, they also smoosh everything you’ve prepped up. And I’ve had ‘em loose, which is worst of all because they invariably slide off of whatever you may sit them on the first time a large wave hits.

The above bait board, however, works flawlessly. And if you have a rail with a 90-degree bend, you can mount one in this fashion with ease. All you have to do is find some rubber-lined stainless-steel U-shaped hose supports, invert them, slide them up onto the rails, then screw ‘em into the bottom of the bait board.  There are four on mine, and they support the board perfectly. Total time investment to rig it up: 10 minutes or so. Total cost: A buck or two for the supports, and whatever the cutting board costs. If you need to rig up a cutting board on your boat, consider this method – it’s the best I’ve seen yet.


About the author:

Lenny Rudow

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Lenny Rudow is Senior Editor for Dominion Marine Media, including Boats.com and Yachtworld.com. With over two decades of experience in marine journalism, he has contributed to publications including Boating Magazine, Marlin Magazine, Boating World, Saltwater Sportsman, Texas Fish & Game, and many others. Lenny is a graduate of the Westlawn School of Yacht Design who has won 28 BWI and OWAA writing awards.
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