Nordhavn Offers Flybridge-Less 75 EYF

Pacific Asian Enterprises said on its website that it has developed a version of its 75 Expedition Yacht Fisher (EYF) without the expansive flybridge common to most sportfishing battlewagons. The change acknowledges the cruising half of this split-personality ocean-going yacht and gives it a more conventional “Norhdavn look.” I took the liberty of scanning a print [...]

10th February 2010.
By Tom Tripp

Nordhavn 75 EYF Without Flybridge

Nordhavn 75 EYF Without Flybridge

Pacific Asian Enterprises said on its website that it has developed a version of its 75 Expedition Yacht Fisher (EYF) without the expansive flybridge common to most sportfishing battlewagons. The change acknowledges the cruising half of this split-personality ocean-going yacht and gives it a more conventional “Norhdavn look.”

I took the liberty of scanning a print of a high-res pdf file of the new profile and layout, which you see here in this article. You can click on the image above for a larger view of it and if you’d like to download the original pdf file, just click here.

According to Chief of Design Jeff Leishman, the design caters to the client who “likes the wide-open layout of the EYF, but doesn’t necessarily need a tower to seek out big game fish.” The boat’s upper deck and huge cockpit provide owners plent of great spaces to sunbathe or entertain al fresco, according to the company.  “And it’s already set up so that if you want to fish, dive, or cruise extensively, all you need to do is pick a destination and go. It’s just a variation of the current Yachtfisher,” says PAE’s vice president Jim Leishman. “I think it will emphasize the versatility of this model.”

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About the author:

Tom Tripp

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Tom is the publisher of www.OceanLines.biz, a website about passagemaking boats and information. He is also a contributor to Chesapeake Bay Magazine who has been at sea aboard everything from a 17-foot homemade wooden fishing boat to a 1,000-foot-long, 96,000-ton, nuclear-powered aircraft carrier.

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