What To Check Before Buying Used Boat Or PWC

Most people would probably agree it's a buyers market for those looking to buy a PWC or boat, and that some of the best deals can be found in the used market. It's there, however, that BoatU.S. notes they've seen the majority of "paperwork problems," from cloudy titles to improper bills of sale. These mistakes can be not only costly, they just might sink your deal. Ready to buy a boat or PWC this season? Here, fresh from BoatU.S., are the "Seven Paperwork Pitfalls" you'll want to avoid:

24th March 2010.
By Jeff Hemmel

Most people would probably agree it’s a buyers market for those looking to buy a PWC or boat, and that some of the best deals can be found in the used market. It’s there, however, that BoatU.S. notes they’ve seen the majority of paperwork problems, from cloudy titles to improper bills of sale. These mistakes can not only be costly, they just might sink your deal.

Ready to buy a pre-owned boat or PWC this season? Here, fresh from BoatU.S., are the “Seven Paperwork Pitfalls” you’ll want to avoid:

1) Registration: It should be current. Also be aware that a boat that is not located in the state it is registered is one indicator that it may have tax issues that could haunt a new owner.

2) Title: The information on the title should match the registration. A title will also usually list any liens on the vessel, such as a bank loan that will need to be paid off in order to transfer the title. It’s important to include a statement in the purchase agreement that requires the seller to pay off the loan within a very limited amount of time after the sale. Any other liens should be cleared up by the seller before any sale occurs.

3) Hull Trace the HIN: Take a pencil and paper to get a rubbing of the boat’s 12-character serial number known as the HIN (hull identification number) and ensure it matches registration and title. If it does not, the seller should correct the problem.

4) Taxes: It’s advisable to get a statement from the buyer stating that any state or local taxes on the vessel have been paid. This can also be easily included in the purchase agreement.

5) Purchase Agreement: It’s smart — and a widely acceptable practice — to include contingencies for the buyer such as securing financing and receiving an acceptable survey and sea trial.

6) Bill of Sale: Prepare this document with the seller’s name as it appears exactly on the title and registration.

7) Payment: A cashier’s check is the best way to consummate the deal, but the name on the check must match the name on the title and registration.

Other tips and suggestions on buying? Check out Boats.com’s Resource Guide.

Everything in order? Make that deal and get on the water…


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About the author:

Jeff Hemmel

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Jeff Hemmel writes for boats.com, Boating, PersonalWatercraft.com, and Powersports Business. The former Senior Editor at Watercraft World, Jeff is a multi-time award winner as well as a 2008 inductee into the IJSBA Hall of Fame. His first book, "The Anti-Pirate Potato Cannon...and 101 Other Things For Young Mariners To Try, Do, & Build On the Water," received a bronze medal in the 2010 Moonbeam Children's Book Awards. For more info, visit Jeff Hemmel's website.

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