The Case For Old Two-Strokes

All the flats skiffs at the Andros South bonefishing lodge in the Bahamas hang Mercury tiller-steered two-strokes off the transom. The reason? “Maintenance,” said lodge owner Andrew Bennett. In remote situations, many four-strokes are too complicated and/or expensive to repair in the field. The basic simplicity of a carburated two-stroke can keep you in the [...]

24th May 2010.
By Pete McDonald

An old outboard put to pasture in the Bahamas

All the flats skiffs at the Andros South bonefishing lodge in the Bahamas hang Mercury tiller-steered two-strokes off the transom. The reason? “Maintenance,” said lodge owner Andrew Bennett. In remote situations, many four-strokes are too complicated and/or expensive to repair in the field. The basic simplicity of a carburated two-stroke can keep you in the game.

At lower horsepower–the two flats skiffs I spent a day on had 55-hp outboards–the fuel consumption difference is usually not extreme enough to overcome the purchase price and maintenance costs over the length of ownership. The lodge flies in a mechanic from Nassau once a year for overhaul and the staff does the rest on its own.

Four strokes have a lot of positive attributes, but there times when a simple carburated two-stroke wins.


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About the author:

Pete McDonald

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Pete McDonald is a contributing editor to Power & Motoryacht. Previously, he spent 11 years on the editorial staff of Boating. He has won multiple writing awards and holds a master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

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The Case For Old Two-Strokes

All the flats skiffs at the Andros South bonefishing lodge in the Bahamas hang Mercury tiller-steered two-strokes off the transom. The reason? “Maintenance,” said lodge owner Andrew Bennett. In remote situations, many four-strokes are too complicated and/or expensive to repair in the field. The basic simplicity of a carburated two-stroke can keep you in the [...]

24th May 2010.
By Pete McDonald

An old outboard put to pasture in the Bahamas

All the flats skiffs at the Andros South bonefishing lodge in the Bahamas hang Mercury tiller-steered two-strokes off the transom. The reason? “Maintenance,” said lodge owner Andrew Bennett. In remote situations, many four-strokes are too complicated and/or expensive to repair in the field. The basic simplicity of a carburated two-stroke can keep you in the game.

At lower horsepower–the two flats skiffs I spent a day on had 55-hp outboards–the fuel consumption difference is usually not extreme enough to overcome the purchase price and maintenance costs over the length of ownership. The lodge flies in a mechanic from Nassau once a year for overhaul and the staff does the rest on its own.

Four strokes have a lot of positive attributes, but there times when a simple carburated two-stroke wins.


Tags: , ,

About the author:

Pete McDonald

Profile
Pete McDonald is a contributing editor to Power & Motoryacht. Previously, he spent 11 years on the editorial staff of Boating. He has won multiple writing awards and holds a master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

Comments are closed.