A Mouse Worked On This Wiring!

I love it when readers send along a photo of something they see on a boat that catches their eye. Recently a reader sent a little gem my way that is perhaps the ultimate in what we used to call a "Mickey Mouse" installation. No offense meant to the Dis...

1st June 2010.
By Ed Sherman

I love it when readers send along a photo of something they see on a boat that catches their eye. Recently a reader sent a little gem my way that is perhaps the ultimate in what we used to call a “Mickey Mouse” installation. No offense meant to the Disney folks, or Mickey for that matter, but truly, would you want Mickey working on your boat?

 So, I’ve decided to create the Mickey Mouse award here for outstanding efforts to do things wrong on boats. The winner will be documented in photographic memory only, and really we only want to document their efforts, so keep those photos coming! People learn from this stuff. Of course the recipient of the award, although not publicly named here for legal reasons, must agree to wear a hat or head band as shown here everytime they work on their boat……

So now, to get a feel for how you might go about winning this coveted award, here’s this week’s winner:

Yes folks that is a Tupperware container screwed into a bulkhead on someone’s boat, and yes that is electrical wiring going into and out of the container.

Please people, all electrical junctions if enclosed need to be in a UL or NEMA type approved box designed and rated for electrical installations. The box shown is useful for storing the left-over macaroni and cheese, not electical junction points……Credit goes for creativity, but big negative points on this install. Sorry, but it’s just too Mickey Mouse for me to handle. 


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Ed Sherman

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Ed Sherman is a regular contributor to boats.com, as well as to Professional Boatbuilder and Cruising World, where he previously was electronics editor. He also is the curriculum director for the American Boat and Yacht Council. Previously, Ed was chairman of the Marine Technology Department at the New England Institute of Technology. Ed’s blog posts appear courtesy of his website, EdsBoatTips.
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http://www.EdsBoatTips.com

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