Non Skid and Gel Coat Repair Job

Over the next few days I'm going to be following the complete replacement of the non-skid surface and gel-coat dings on a 1977 Silverton sportfish that a friend of mine is restoring. Some photos of the boat as it stands right now are here: You can ...

15th June 2010.
By Ed Sherman

Over the next few days I’m going to be following the complete replacement of the non-skid surface and gel-coat dings on a 1977 Silverton sportfish that a friend of mine is restoring. Some photos of the boat as it stands right now are here:

You can see from the above two photos that the non-skid surface has worn right through in some spots and is all worn and irreparably dirty.

In the cockpit shown below, you can see the remains of the glue that was used to hold a carpet that was added by the original owner to the cockpit sole. All that is going to be removed and the cockpit will end up with a newly coated surface.

The process begins with a combination of hand and power sanding the old usrfaces to remove all of the old non-skid and glue. Here we see the glass man removing the old non-skid from the forward deck.

The trick here is to sand down to the surface of the original gel-coat and no further, without making any gouges that bring things down to the raw fiberglass surface. What grit sandpaper to use? 36 grit will do nicely here but it does depend on the courseness of the non-skid surface to begin with. This is followed up with hand sanding with 80 grit to get to the original surface.

I’ll follow up tomorrow after I get to inspect the prep-work being done today. This should be an interesting project. So stay tuned.

 


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Ed Sherman

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Ed Sherman is a regular contributor to boats.com, as well as to Professional Boatbuilder and Cruising World, where he previously was electronics editor. He also is the curriculum director for the American Boat and Yacht Council. Previously, Ed was chairman of the Marine Technology Department at the New England Institute of Technology. Ed’s blog posts appear courtesy of his website, EdsBoatTips.
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