Non-Skid/GelCoat Repair, Part 2

The fiberglass man finished prepping the 1977 Silverton yesterday so that he can now begin the process of getting ready for new non-skid surfacing on deck. He's still sanding away in the photo below:    When all is said and done, the 36 grit did ...

16th June 2010.
By Ed Sherman

The fiberglass man finished prepping the 1977 Silverton yesterday so that he can now begin the process of getting ready for new non-skid surfacing on deck. He’s still sanding away in the photo below:

 

 When all is said and done, the 36 grit did a great job here, but some interesting things did show up that were not really a surprise, and that you should understand.

In a few places all of the original gel coat did get sanded through. This is common when doing a job like this, especially at corner edges. This is because when boats are built and the gel-coat is being sprayed into the mold, the thickness of the gel-coat is often a bit thinner at corners than the flat surfaces. The dark spots in the photo below show some of the sanded through spots. Also, what you see as some light brown areas are just some of the left over non-skid material. It’s been sanded thoroughly, so a new coating will adhere right over this new surface.

These thin spots that are now showing glass through will disappear as long as the thickness of the new coating is adequate.

Today, the detail of proper masking off should follow. We’ll get a look at that tomorrow.


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Ed Sherman

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Ed Sherman is a regular contributor to boats.com, as well as to Professional Boatbuilder and Cruising World, where he previously was electronics editor. He also is the curriculum director for the American Boat and Yacht Council. Previously, Ed was chairman of the Marine Technology Department at the New England Institute of Technology. Ed’s blog posts appear courtesy of his website, EdsBoatTips.
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