BP To Work With Private Boat Owners

The BP oil spill in the Gulf hasn’t come close to being contained. The company’s getting a slight reprieve from media scrutiny while LeBron James decides where he’s going to play basketball next year, but the oil is still flowing. We’re looking at mid-August for relief, according to this CNN report. According to this USA [...]

8th July 2010.
By Pete McDonald

GRAND ISLE, LA - JUNE 28: Workers pull aboard boom being used to help block the flow of the oil spill from the Deepwater Horizon in Cat Bay on June 28, 2010 near Grand Isle, Louisiana. According to reports June 28, analysts are saying the economic damage from the oil may not impact the U.S. economy beyond the Gulf rregion. Millions of gallons of oil have spilled into the Gulf since the April 20 explosion on the BP leased oil drilling platform. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

The BP oil spill in the Gulf hasn’t come close to being contained. The company’s getting a slight reprieve from media scrutiny while LeBron James decides where he’s going to play basketball next year, but the oil is still flowing. We’re looking at mid-August for relief, according to this CNN report.

According to this USA Today report, BP will get more local boats involved, hiring them for cleanup duty. Right now the company has enlisted 8,500 boats from affected regions, presumably people who have lost their livelihood due to the contaminated seas.

The article goes into more detail on payment:

“…For example, vessels shorter than 30 feet get $1,200 for a 24-hour period, while those longer than 65 feet get $3,000. Crewmembers get $200 per eight-hour day for responding to the spill or receiving training.”

Meanwhile, the Boating Line tweeted an article stating that vessels are banned from coming within 65 feet of an oil boom.

Beyond that, tarpon, bluefin tuna, sea turtles, and other marine wildlife are pretty much screwed.

Beyond the oil, there’s no telling the long term effects from the daily doses of dispersant.

Where did LeBron say he’s signing again?


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About the author:

Pete McDonald

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Pete McDonald is a contributing editor to Power & Motoryacht. Previously, he spent 11 years on the editorial staff of Boating. He has won multiple writing awards and holds a master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

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