Outbound 52 Review Part II

Part two of two of a review of the Outbound 52 by Outbound Yachts Yesterday, I talked about the smart and sassy Outoubnd 52 that not only looks great but has some very smart features.  Today, we'll take a look below decks at an interior that looks gr...

1st July 2010.
By Zuzana Prochazka

Part two of two of a review of the Outbound 52 by Outbound Yachts

Yesterday, I talked about the smart and sassy Outoubnd 52 that not only looks great but has some very smart features.  Today, we’ll take a look below decks at an interior that looks great but is also very functional. 

The three step companionway on the Outbound 52 is easy to maneuver for anyone and makes the cockpit an extension of the interior. The raised saloon is light and airy and provides space for tanks and four 225 Amp AGM house batteries under the sole, keeping the weight low and centered.  This opens up stowage under settees and bunks and keeps the boat open and livable. 

The interior is semi-custom with three cabin layouts offered forward.  One is a center island berth cabin with an enormous head on port.  The other two offer a smaller head and separate shower on starboard with a cabin/office across and either an offset double or standard V-berth in the forward cabin. 

The spacious saloon features liquor and wine glass cabinets and two straight settees which will seat eight easily.  Outbound will need to investigate however, how to re-design and enlarge the table for a more functional dining configuration.  On starboard, the forward facing nav station is near the companionway and provides plenty of room outboard and forward for electronics with large displays.  A hinged electrical panel makes for easy access and 100 square feet of copper ground strap is glassed to the hull at the waterline, ready for SSB installation.  Now, that’s thinking ahead.

On port is a pass-through galley with a front and top loading reefer and top loading freezer.  There is no shortage of counter or storage space and drawers abound. A three burner Force 10 stove with oven, microwave and dual sinks inboard complete the galley which is functional and very much in the center of the social activity as well. 

The aft cabin is luxurious and is accessed via the galley on port or the head on starboard.  An island berth and a private head with walk-in shower make this a very comfortable space.  A washer dryer combo is accessible via the shower.  The joinery is impeccable throughout and interiors are offered in cherry or teak. 

The smartest space aboard is the “sea cabin” which is on starboard behind the nav station and across from the engine room.  It offers a sea berth that converts to a stainless steel topped workbench with plenty of drawer storage below for tools with nice proximity to the space that will most likely require them. 

Access to the engine is good with side access through a door, panel access under the hinged companionway and under the galley, and even via a floor panel of the cockpit which can be removed – a very nice feature when working on the Yanmar turbo charged 110HP diesel in the tropics.  A dual Racor system is standard and four baffled, fiberglass tanks store 250 gallons of fuel.  For safety, there are two electric bilge pumps and two Whale Gusher manual pumps – with handles mounted at the helm and in the cabin. 

Cabinets are louvered for good air circulation, lockers are lined with cedar, hatches have hinged screens, the headliner is easily removed in sections, there is courtesy lighting throughout the cabin sole, and both the floor boards and cabinets have positive, flush locks.  There are even two 30 amp shore power connections located fore and aft.  Anyone who has ever worked on an older boat where these features were not considered, will appreciate the smarts that went into the Outbound 52.

The Outbound 52 is a beautiful boat with an excellent finish, designed intelligently by people who have been offshore and who understand the challenges of short handed cruising.  The Outbound philosophy focuses on low maintenance, system simplicity, good access and practicality.  Mostly, the key is to minimize fatigue on long passages so the yacht can be handled by one member of a mature cruising couple with ease.

The specs are below again just in case you missed them yesterday.  For more information on this boat or other Outbound models, visit their website at www.outboundyachts.com.

Length overall   52’ 0”
Length of waterline  47’ 10”
Beam    15’ 4”
Draft standard   7’ 6” / 6’ 6”
Displacement   39,500 lbs
Ballast   14,000 lbs
Sail area  1312 sq. ft.
SA/D   18.35
D/L   160
Water capacity  225 gallons
Fuel capacity   250 gallons
Engine    Yanmar 100HP


About the author:

Zuzana Prochazka

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Zuzana Prochazka is a writer and photographer who freelances for a dozen boating magazines and websites. A USCG 100 Ton Master, Zuzana has cruised, chartered and skippered flotillas in many parts of the world and serves as a presenter on charter destinations and topics. She is the Chair of the New Product Awards committee, judging innovative boats and gear at NMMA and NMEA shows, and currently serves as immediate past president of Boating Writers International. She contributes to Boats.com and YachtWorld.com, and also blogs regularly on her boat review site, TalkoftheDock.com.
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