For Sale by


Wooden Ships

2 Southford Road
Devon
TQ6 9QS
United Kingdom

Fax:  +44 (0)1803 833899

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1972 Maurice Griffiths Good Hope

£47,500 (Listed price: US$76,632)

Cornwall,United Kingdom

Photo 1
Cockpit
Wheel steering
Coachroof
Foredeck
Cabin entrance
Cockpit locker
Main mast
Side deck
Saloon
Engine
Saloon looking aft
Galley
Forepeak
Deckhead
Main companionway
Aft cabin
Aft cabin heads
Forward head
Batterries
  • Boat Summary
  • Full Details

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Description/Condition

Maurice Griffiths Good Hope Ketch in superb condition. Some very typical Griffiths features but bigger, sleeker and faster than most of his designs. Large ketch rig to give respectable sailing performance, new 50Hp Beta engine. 7 berths with double in seperate aft cabin, double saloon setee berth, saloon single and twin fore peak berths. This superb arrangement gives many seperate living areas for comfortable family cruising. A large volume cruising yacht in fantastic condition.




Boat Details
Hull Material WoodBeam 11 ft 6 in 
Max Draft 5 ft 10 inLength Overall 42 ft 
For Sale by

Wooden Ships

2 Southford Road
Devon
TQ6 9QS
United Kingdom

Fax:  +44 (0)1803 833899

Full specification

Maurice Griffiths Good Hope Ketch.

Built by Purbrook-Rossitors of Christchurch, Hants in 1972 for the previous owner.

In his book, Little Ships and Shoal Waters, Maurice Griffiths describes the evolution of the Good Hope design, produced immediately after his retirement as editor of Yachting Monthly to the very specific requirements of a sailing friend.

Maurice Griffiths was a great moving force in post war yachting. An East Coast man, as editor of Yachting Monthly for many years he was the inspiration to so many people who took up yachting at that time. Money was short, facilities were basic but the old yards were still there and transport to the coast was becoming easier.

In his designs, he took much of his inspiration from the East Coast working boats built for those shoal waters but was also influenced by some American designs, especially from the Chesapeake Bay area.

He is best known for his smaller shoal draft designs which appealed to the growing market of impecunious new yachtsmen at the time, designs which were built in quite large numbers by the small East Coast yards and even several designs aimed at the home builder.

 

The Good Hope is one of his larger designs. In his book, he talks of 3 being built in the late 1960’s followed by this one, Cinnamon Lady built 1971, launched in 1972.

The yachts were very well received and proved to be good sea boats so he went on to modify the design for ferro-cement construction which proved popular in S Africa and Australia.

This example of the Good Hope design was extended aft in build by 30” to give a slightly larger aft cabin which argueably makes her a slightly more elegant yacht.

 

The design features a long straight keel which carries the external ballast keel right up to underneath the mast with a slightly cut-away fore foot up to the stem and an overhanging transom stern.

Full, round bilge gives plenty of hull stability without excessive draft as well as a good width of cabin sole.

The rudder is hung on the stern post under the counter over-hang.

On deck, she has a centre cock-pit which allows a separate aft cabin under it’s own aft coach-roof. The forward coach-roof reaches from the cock-pit to forward of the main mast leaving generous side decks and a clear fore deck.

 

Planked in 1 1/8” iroko, caulked and payed and finished varnished with Epiphanes.

All fastened with copper nails and roves to heavy laminated oak frames approx 3” x 2” at 30” centres with 3 steam bent intermediate timbers.

All oak floors across the centre-line.

 

Approx 4 tons + cast iron external ballast keel with iron bolts through the floors.

The bolts were checked in the winter of 06/07 when the 2 bolts under the engine and 2 forward were replaced due to minimal deterioration.

Small quantity lead trimming ballast in the bilge.

 

Wheel steering on a Whitlock pedestal in the cock-pit with cables to the quadrant under the aft deck, accessed through the aft cabin.

The rudder stock is carried on up through the aft deck in a water-tight packing gland with a fixed varnished tiller on the squared stock-head for emergency use.

 

The deck is in scrubbed teak over a ply sub deck, yacht laid to a varnished cover-board and joggled to a varnished king-plank.

All varnished spruce deck beams, both full width beams under the fore deck and the half beams down the side decks on a massive section beam-shelf, reinforced by a heavy, long clamp in way of the main mast should very adequately spread the rigging loads and avoid any tendency to deform in this area for very many years.

12” bulwarks all round with heavy varnished iroko capping rail on varni

Custom Contact Information

 

email: info@woodenships.co.uk

www.woodenships.co.uk