If your idea of boating is enjoying short cruises and fast crossings, diving, improving your wakeboarding skills, doing a bit of fishing, or just spending a weekend on the water with the family, look no further than Jeanneau’s latest Cap Camarat 10.5 WA. Jeanneau’s Cap Camarat outboard range comes in three versions, Walkaround, Day Cruiser, and Center Console, with over a dozen models ranging from the compact 4.5 CC to the 10.5 WA, the twin outboard flagship is a standout performer.

This is a sporty-looking boat, but it still offers a significant amount of space and volume belowdecks including two double berths. However, this is definitely a boat to enjoy the outdoors and the deck has two distinct areas that allow you to do just that: the cockpit and the forward sundeck.

This is a sporty-looking boat, but it still offers a significant amount of space and volume belowdecks including two double berths. However, this is definitely a boat to enjoy the outdoors and the deck has two distinct areas that allow you to do just that: the cockpit and the forward sundeck.


Outdoor life


Step aboard through the aft platforms on either side of the twin outboards or through the side, since the generous beam allows for a wide passageway to port. The aft platforms are connected by a narrow passage between the outboards and the transom. It’s a very practical arrangement allowing for easy access to shore and sea as well as for carrying out engine maintenance and repair.

The cockpit is quite spacious and definitely one of the best features of the 10.5 WA. There’s an L-shaped seat across the transom with additional seating provided by a flip-up seat to starboard and another to port, which also creates a dinette for 10. The round table can be lowered and converted into a sunpad. An outdoor galley unit is located practically amidships, and its molded structure provides support to the helm’s three foldable seats.

The outdoor galley has everything you need: a double sink, counter, the option of installing an electric grill, a refrigerator, and plenty of stowage. It’s slightly raised; a single step that improves the view from the helm as well as the headroom below deck.

The outdoor galley has everything you need: a double sink, counter, the option of installing an electric grill, a refrigerator, and plenty of stowage. It’s slightly raised; a single step improves the view from the helm as well as the headroom below deck.



The sidedecks make access to the bow quite easy on either side, although the port side has a wider corridor. While cruising with people on the bow is not recommended, there are grab rails on each side of the cushioned area to provide a bit more safety.

On the bow sunpad there’s room for three or four people.

On the bow sunpad there’s room for three or four people.


Belowdecks


Access to the interior is through a methacrylate sliding door to starboard of the helm station. Down below, a dinette can be converted into a berth by pushing down the table. There’s a small galley with a stove, sink and refrigerator to port, and a head compartment with a shower just above the toilet, a welcome amenity in a boat this size. Further back, just below the helm station, you’ll find another double-berth which allows for a family of four to spend a few nights quite comfortably.

Cap Camarat 10.5 Performance


The hull and deck lines coupled with the elegant graphics achieve a styled look, but there’s still a bulky feeling to this walkaround. The hull was designed by Michael Peters and is a variation on a patented twin-step hull developed for the US Coast Guard, a system called Stepped “V” Ventilated Tunnel or SVVT. The design allows for air to come in through the chines and be channeled aft to reduce drag and provide lift. (Watch our Stepped Hulls video to learn more about how hull steps function).

The twin steps in the Cap Camarat 10.5 WA hull, visible here, give the boat an efficiency and speed boost.

The twin steps in the Cap Camarat 10.5 WA hull, visible here, give the boat an efficiency and speed boost.



Our test boat was equipped with two Yamaha F350 V8 outboards, the maximum recommended power. During our sea trial the response was adequate and the boat ran well on the water, even with a slightly choppy sea. The boat peaked at 47 knots, but there was clearly an increase in speed—almost double—after reaching planning speed. It’s difficult for this boat to take off before reaching 3,000 RPM, but as soon as it does, you can expect to get close to 20 knots.

Technology keeps moving forward and Yamaha keeps up to speed on this, and its new outboard engines control the trim automatically. Another advantage of automation is to be enjoyed when maneuvering in closed quarters, with its joystick-assisted Helm Master docking system (which is optional).

There’s a long list of optional equipment to choose from; one of the most useful is the the Tip top, a hard-top that rests on the coamings and windscreen stanchions and provides protection at the helm. If you’re a year-round boater, you can also get a cockpit enclosure. The Cap Camarat 10.5 WA is a multi-tasker, and will allow you to engage in many different pursuits.

Other Choices: Those interested in the Cap Camarat 10.5 who want a slightly fishier vessel might look at the Grady-White 330. If an outboard-powered express cruiser is more your style, check out the Sea Ray 370 Venture.

For more information, visit Jeanneau.






























Specifications
Length34'6"
Beam10'2"
Draft2'8"
Displacement9,370 lbs
Fuel capacity210 gal.
Water capacity42 gal.

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