Question: I’m starting to get my new boat ready for the upcoming boating season. The other day I went down to the boat and starting lifting up access plates and panels to check out what was behind them all.

The good news is that you have good access to the hose connections. The bad news is that you'll have to trace each hose to find out what it does.

The good news is that you have good access to the hose connections. The bad news is that you'll have to trace each hose to find out what it does.



Here's a pic of the top of my fuel tank and some of the fuel hoses coming out of the tank. None of the hoses offer any information about where they go or what they supply. This is very frustrating. The boat is diesel-powered and I do have a permanently installed diesel-fueled generator. Are there any standards or best practices that would tell me how to identify these hoses and what to do about this?

Answer: The ABYC speaks quite a bit within its standards about identifying the type of fuel hose and providing service access to the connection points within the system. We’ve covered this part of the issue before in Confusion over Marine Fuel Hose Numbers and Diesel Fuel Hose Ratings Explained.

When I zoom in on your photo I see that the requisite labeling for USCG and other ratings are in place, and your set-up suggests that you do have convenient access to check the integrity of the hose connections.

However, the ABYC does not state anywhere that the purpose of each hose needs to be identified.

I’d look in your boat’s owner’s manual first to see if the function of each hose is identified. If not, then the search is on—you’re going to have to see where these hoses go to or come from, which could be a bit of a pain depending upon how far they travel under those floor boards. It will help to have another person on board to feel taps and tugs as you do your detective work on each hose. When you’ve identified the purpose of a hose, mark it with permanent marker, tags, ink on tape, or whatever works best for you and your crew.

Good luck!

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