It’s been five years since Seven blew the roof off the Miami Convention Center at the 2011 boat show with a small display of its prototype Seven Marine 557 HP outboard, the most outrageous outboard motor we’d ever seen—or even imagined. Seven Marine was back at the Miami International Boat Show this year, and in a way, that’s news right there. Powered by a marinized 6.2-liter supercharged GM LSA Gen 4 V8 engine, the Seven 557 was both a gorgeous and a technological marvel. But it also struck some of us as a product with limited appeal. How many people really need a 557 HP outboard, after all?

Big and beautiful, Seven produce a custom finish for its outboards to match any boat.

Big and beautiful, Seven produces a custom finish for its outboards to match any boat.



Now we realize we were asking the wrong question.

Nobody needs a 557 HP outboard. But it turns out that plenty of people want one. Enough customers, at least, to get the Milwaukee-based manufacturer up and running. And Seven Marine has continued to invest in its outboard product. For example, the dual-prop CR gearcase Seven showed in 2015 is now ready for production. The CR case is intended to push the heaviest boats, such as a 42-footer with twins, according to Seven marine Vice President Eric Davis, which works out to about 10,000 pounds per outboard.

The cut-away Seven shows how the 6.2-liter V8 is positioned over a ZF transmission and the housing for the belt drive that transfers the power. The motor also features a closed cooling system. The base engine weighs about 1,100 pounds.

The cut-away Seven shows how the 6.2-liter V8 is positioned over a ZF transmission and the housing for the gear drive that transfers the power. The motor also features a closed cooling system. The base engine weighs about 1,100 pounds.



Last year saw the debut of the Seven Marine 627, with more power and other updates. Seven was awarded an Innovation Award for the 627, which also has additional features like the SpectraBlade cowl, which incorporates strips of diffused LED lighting that can be adjusted to produce just about any color imaginable. Again, nobody needs an outboard with LED lighting, but it sure looks cool on the water. And Seven has made some subtle revisions to its standard gearcase shape, enlarging the anti-ventilation plate by 20 percent to present more leverage and improve on-plane performance, and a change to the shape of the gearcase nose to produce more trim response at speed. Eric Davis told me both changes will help the Seven 557 and Seven 627 perform better on the largest, heaviest boat applications. Take a look at these improvements for yourself, in the First Look Video we shot at the Miami show.

Call it boutique or call it an ego motor. Call it whatever you like—it’s clear that Seven Marine correctly identified a niche for a wonderfully outrageous outboard.

For more information, visit Seven Marine.

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