Search Boats for Sale

C&C 121

$115,000

Presented For Sale By:

Eastport Yacht Sales

Eastport Yacht Sales
Annapolis, Maryland, 21403
United States
View Seller Inventory

Contact Seller

X
* We weren't able to post your message, please check the highlighted fields and try again.

Thanks

We have sent your information directly to the seller.

Request cannot be completed

You may have entered incorrect information or the server is temporarily down. Please reload this page and try again later.

Contact Seller

X
* We weren't able to post your message, please check the highlighted fields and try again.

Thanks

We have sent your information directly to the seller.

Request cannot be completed

You may have entered incorrect information or the server is temporarily down. Please reload this page and try again later.

Make C&C
Model 121
Year 2000
Condition Used
Price US$115,000
Type Sail
Class Racer/Cruiser
Length 40 ft
Fuel Type Diesel
Hull Material Fiberglass
Location Annapolis, Maryland
LOA 40 ft
Length at Water Line 35 ft 6 in
Beam 13 ft 1 in
Max Draft 6 ft 6 in
Keel Type Fin
Ballast 6200 lb
Dry Weight 14100 lb
Engine Make Volvo Penta
Fuel Type Diesel
Power 38 hp
Drive Type Sail Drive
Heads 1
Fuel Tanks 36 gal
Fresh Water Tanks 80 gal
Hull Shape Monohull
Hull Warranty None

Description

Price reduced - "Baraka" is available now for $115,000!  She is ready to go cruising or racing.

There have been many improvements over this owner's tenure of ownership.  Please review for a complete list.

All Volvo Penta engine work done by Vosbury Marine, Annapolis.  Oil analysis run every year with excellent results.

Show More…

Upgrades

Year - Improvements, Additions and Upgrades
2000 Upgraded destroyer wheel to larger diameter to allow steering from side deck
2005 Lewmar Sprint 1000 anchor windlass w/ spares and forward battery installed
2005 Installed two Cruisair 15 ton air conditioning/heating units
2005 Installed ventilation fans in all three main compartments
2005 Achilles LSR 96 inflatable w/ aluminum floor and Mercury 8 hp outboard
2005 Companionway rubber treads and safety latch installed
2005 Lifesling man overboard retrieval system added
2005 Mirrors installed in fore and aft berths
2006 Raymarine E80 chartplotter installed in rotating NavPod at helm
2006 US Sailing Performance Package
2006 Flat screen TV/DVD player with navigation input and Raymarine local controls installed
2006 Raymarine Radar and GPS installed on self leveling backstay mount w/ additional room for antennas
2006 Hydraulic backstay adjuster installed w/ Windex, light, and burgee halyard
2006 Icom VHF installed with CommandMic at helm station
2006 Three cockpit cushions and back cushions added
2006 Magma grill w/ rail mount added
2006 Quantum .75 oz Asymetrical Spinaker w/ ATN dousing sleeve
2006 Autopilot upgraded to Raymarine 6002
2006 V-berth and aft stateroom mattresses upgraded - V-berth changed to memory foam mattress
2006 Shelves added to create pantry locker in galley area and additional storage in forward stateroom
2006 Teak outboard bracket installed on sternrail
2006 Dutchman flaking system for main sail
2007 Antifouling removed, hull barrier coated to 3 mils and anti-fouling applied
2007 Saildrive hull seal replaced
2007 Mast removed, stripped, corrosion repaired, halyard topping lift installed and re-Awlgripped
2007 Dual bow rollers installed with port roller fitted for a removeable 4" bowsprit
2007 Forespar carbon-aluminum whisker pole installed w/ mounts on forward side of mast
2007 Antal main track installed and upgraded boom lift to Hall Spars
2007 Masthead tri-color with strobe installed, upgraded mast wiring
2007 Running backstays including removable attachments on mast and padeyes on stern added
2007 Attachment points for inner forestay added to mast and foredeck
2007 Separate nav light panel installed in starboard lazarette for easy helm access
2007 Two solar powered vent fans installed
2007 Additional custom salon overhead handrails installed
2007 Inspected all standing rigging
2007 Installed stanchion mounted roller furling blocks
2007 Installed engine raw water Speedseal kit
2007 Port and starboard deck jacklines and pad eyes, port and starboard cockpit jacklines and pad eyes and two helm pad eyes added
2007 Salon berth lee cloths and hitch lines added
2007 Man over board pole mounted
2008 Aqualarm bilge pump monitor installed
2008 Saildrive rubber hull fairing replaced w/ removable hard fairing
2008 Six (2 fwd, 2 mid-ship, 2 aft) Schaeffer removable cleats/padeyes added
2008 Jib and main halyards, jib car control lines, main sheet, topping lift, both main reefing lines and boom vang replaced
2008 Engine compartment vent fan installed
2008 Cockpit speakers modified w/ covers 
2008 Installed winch handle pockets at helm and winch handle mount below decks
2008 Overhead/handheld compass mounted in forward berth as back-up and to monitor boat heading at anchor
2008 Stormglass added at nav station
2009 Salt Water pump and washdown hose installed
2009 All new canvas including dodger, bimini, transition piece, covers for boom, helm, bimini, and outboard, sheet bags and wind scoop
2009 Back-up high capacity Bilge pump and bilge alarm installed
2009 North 3DL Marathon S full batten main, 150% jib , and 95% jib
2009 Upgraded VHF to iCom M-502
2009 Upgraded two jib winch handles to Lewmar One-Touch
2009 Soap dispensers added at galley (dishwashing) and head (hand) sinks
2010 Upgraded bow anchor to 44 lb Rocna
2010 Harken jib electric furling added
2010 Sewn elkhide spreader end covers installed
2010 Two lower spreader halyards (radar reflector to port and flag to stbd) installed
2010 Engine raw water strainer added
2010 General Ecology Seagull IV water filter and separate tap added
2011 Plumbing isolation valves for H/C fresh water added
2011 Galvanic isolater installed
2011 Dyson cordless vacuum cleaner mounted forward
2011 Electronic Barograph installed at nav station
2011 Both floor drains in head and shower enlarged and piped to sump pump
2011 Automatic latch for head door fabricated and installed
2012 Hull re-barrier coated
2012 Teak folding cockpit table with extension installed
2012 Additional stowage under nav station
2012 Stereo upgraded to Clarion and iPod connection added
2013 Fuel tank sampling tube installed
2013 Red chart light added at nav station
2014 Rescue stick installed
2014 Hull to keel joint sealed
2014 Nav station overhang shortened as per newer models
2016 Replaced house and engine start AGM batteries

Galley

 

- 3 Burner Force 10 LP gas gimballed propane stove with oven with Remote sniffer and LPG shut off 
- 9" deep stainless steel, double galley sinks and Granicote solid surface countertops 
- Storage under galley sink through ventilated varnished cherry door 
- Molded icebox with Granicote solid surface countertop and four inches of insulation 
- Hot and cold pressure water with easy service access to pump and plumbing 
- Freshwater plumbing features polyethylene tubing and Whale mechanical fittings 
- All below-water hose connections are double-clamped for added security 
- Premium marine grade hoses throughout 
- Extensive lockers and shelves 
- 80 gallons (302.83 l) freshwater in custom-built aluminum tanks, two-tank system with selection manifold

 

Electronics

- Raymarine E80 Chartplotter at Helm

- B&G Quad MFD Display at Helm

- B&G Wind at Helm

- Raymarine ST6002 Autopilot

- iPad Mount at Helm

- ICOM M502 VHF with RAM

- Battery Monitoring System

Hull and Deck

- Hull construction is a vinylester laminate vacuum bagged with CoreCell core laminate locally reinforced with carbon fiber. The hull is postcured to 145 degrees. 

- The laminate in the keel area is reinforced with multiple plies of high-tensile carbon-fiber 
unidirectional reinforcements 

- Premium grade gelcoat provides superior gloss, fade resistance, and resistance to surface crazing. 

- Interior is completely painted out for enhanced cosmetics and to seal interior laminate surfaces.

- Hull is backed by industry-leading, non-prorated, transferable 15-year no blister, hull structure warranty.

- Deck is a balanced composite laminate utilizing vinylester resin, uni-directional "E"-glass reinforcement, and high strength/stiffness Baltek premium AL 600 balsa coring.

- Deck is locally reinforced at high load areas with additional plies of bi-directional "E"-glass reinforcement.

- White non-skid.

- Premium grade gelcoat provides superior gloss, resistance to fading, and resistance to crazing.

- Deck coring windows are located at all hardware installations to maintain the watertight integrity of the deck coring.

- Molded in aluminum backing plates on all highly loaded deck hardware

- Hull to deck joint is secured with 1/4-20 stainless machine screws installed on 4" centers through the full-length 6061 T6 aluminum backing plate embedded in the hull flange. This method exceeds the recommended installation requirements of the ABS scantling for offshore sailing yachts.

- Hull to deck joint is sealed with 3M 5200 adhesive sealant

- Composite light RTM match-molded deck locker hatches assure strict thickness controls allowing accurate gasket seal of cockpit openings. Conventional construction uses single-sided moldings with painted raw fiberglass underside.

- Double lifeline gate at transom

From Sailing Magazine

Despite the fact that the new C&C 121 is a thoroughly modern boat, it left me feeling quite nostalgic during a recent test sail on Chesapeake Bay.

I learned to sail on Lake St. Clair in the '70s when Canadian- based C&C ruled the waves. A few slips away from my Bristol 27 was a red-hulled C&C 39, which is still one of my all-time favorite boats. It was sexy and looked fast just tied to the dock, all the while maintaining a certain elegance. It was owned by an engineer who worked at Ford designing experimental cars, and he had assured me the boat was absolutely state-of-the-art-a phrase that hadn't yet become hackneyed. I hitched a ride once, and as we clipped along at the seemingly indecent speed of 7 knots, I realized just how old my good-ol' Bristol really was.

Today's C&Cs are built by Fairport Yachts, the same Ohio company that produces the Tartan lineup. Although the boats are no longer built north of the border, the company is taking great pains to keep up the C&C pedigree. The 121 might just be the boat that will help C&C reclaim the magic that at one time made it the dominant sailboat manufacturer in North America.

The 121 is the flagship of the C&C Express Series and possesses that elusive combination of uncompromising performance and big, luxurious accommodations. Designer Tim Jacket should be commended. The 121 delivers-this is a legitimate racer-cruiser. Although, two questions remain. Will speed wonks, who seem more interested in one-designs these days, opt for a boat with a lovely interior and an aluminum spar? And will cruisers be intimidated by double digits on their speedos? 

C&C hopes the answers are yes and no, in that order.

Even before we boarded the boat at Backyard Boats Marina, on Spa Creek, just across from the Annapolis City Docks, I spotted the striking baby-blue hull while driving over the bridge. And as we had a cool, breezy morning for the test I was eager to get sailing. Once clear of the moored boats, we canned the 38-horsepower Volvo MD saildrive and quickly hauled up the full-batten main and unfurled the genoa. All control lines are led aft to the cockpit underneath the deck, which keeps the cabintop clean. The acceleration was impressive as we charged toward the Eastern Shore.

C&C was a pioneer in cored construction-especially with the use of balsa-cored hulls-and was one of the first builders to use vacuum bagging. The 121 continues the progressive construction techniques that have been a hallmark of C&C for more than 30 years. The hull is laminated with E-glass and Kevlar. Vinylester resin is used to prevent osmotic blisters. The 121 comes standard with a 10-year blister guarantee.

Throughout the years of change and turmoil at C&C, one design and construction philosophy has remained constant: composite laminates are superior to solid. This statement is undeniably true, so long as the coring is well done and doesn't separate or delaminate within the hull. The new 121 is cored with Core Cell, a linear foam core that is exceptionally strong, light and, most importantly, water resistant. Core Cell almost eliminates the problem of water migration, the bane of older coring materials. C&C omits the core in high-stress areas around the chainplates, through-hull fittings and keel floors. The hull laminate is vacuum bagged, which distributes pressure evenly over the laminate while removing air with a vacuum pump.

The hull and deck are joined on an inward-facing flange that has an aluminum bar molded into it. The deck is set on the flange in a bed of 3M 5200 and then fasteners are drilled and tapped into the aluminum. C&C's trademark toerail is incorporated in the joint, and the aluminum bar acts as a full-length backing plate. 

A structural grid and hull pan are bonded to the hull, and the bulkheads and internal furnishings are bonded with adhesives developed for the aerospace industry. A fiberglass integral web, spreading the rigging loads over a large area, supports the chainplate pods. Deck fittings are backed with 1/4-inch aluminum, which is tapped to allow fasteners to be set and removed for periodic servicing. C&C has put a great deal of thought into the future servicing of fittings, a real aid to the boat owner. 

The 5,500-pound, high-lift keel is bolted to the hull. Either the optional 5-foot shoal-draft or 8-foot deep-draft keel is available. The rudder blade is elliptical with a foam core, and the rudder stock is stainless steel.

The 121's cockpit is designed for efficient sailing. The standard wheel is a 48-inch destroyer type, and our test boat was fitted with the 54-inch optional model. Either way, the Edson rack-and-pinion steering system is exceptional. The steering is tight and there is plenty of feel. The primary winches are set well aft and easily reached from the helm, a tip-off that the boat is not just designed to be sailed with a large crew. Every control line is led aft from the base of the mast under the deck to the cockpit. As noted earlier, these keep the cabintop clean. But I confess I still like to see my lines. The cockpit seats are comfortable, and there is good foot support when heeled. There is a large locker to starboard and additional storage beneath the helm seat. There is also a swim step astern, with a ladder, another sign that there is a soft side to this speedster. 

You do appreciate the hidden running gear when you make your way forward. The molded nonskid provides good traction, and there are stainless grab rails on the deckhouse. There is no provision made for anchoring, so if you intend to cruise the boat you will need to add the optional bow roller and windlass. There is, however, a molded anchor locker with an overboard drain. 

Roller furling is standard, and the foil headstay is easily converted to racing mode. The furling drum is neatly tucked below deck, allowing the jib to be tacked low for performance.

The deck hardware is all first rate. I would definitely select the adjustable genoa leads, as opposed to the standard pin-stop cars, as well as the rod vang. The mainsheet is a four-part purchase and the traveler is over the companionway for midboom sheeting. In a stiff blow the powerful main might be overloaded, requiring more purchase.

The standard sails include a full-batten Dacron main and 135-percent Dacron roller genoa. Naturally if you plan to race the boat seriously you will need to upgrade the sail inventory. The mast is anodized aluminum, which I think is a good choice for keeping the cost under control. Carbon spars on any boat up the price tag dramatically. The anodized boom includes single-line slab reefing as standard. The rig allows the option of flying masthead chutes to provide plenty of oomph off the wind.

The varnished cherry interior is nicely arranged and beautifully finished. The fine entry is evident in the forward cabin, although there is still plenty of room for a double berth, hanging locker and storage shelves. The saloon features a U-shaped settee with a drop-leaf centerline table and a straight settee opposite. A close inspection of the cherry-trimmed cabinets reveals dovetail joints and handsome overall craftsmanship. While it would be challenging to find enough storage space for a long passage, the area above and outboard of the settees can swallow up extra provisions or an optional TV/VCR locker.

The galley is to port and includes a standard two-burner stove with oven and 12-volt refrigeration. There isn't a lot of counter space, but what you put on the counter will stay put-the fiddle edges are stout. The nav station is opposite the galley and set at an angle. The electrical panel is outboard, and there is plenty of room for instrumentation on the forward panel. The head is behind the nav station and includes a separate shower stall. This is good placement for the head; the motion is less volatile and it can double as a wet locker. One good head in a 38-foot boat is a better arrangement than two cramped spaces without any elbow room.

There is a large, athwartship double aft, tucked under the cockpit, with a hanging locker and additional storage under the bunk. This will likely be the best sea berth on the boat. Ventilation includes six overhead hatches, although the one in the aft cabin is small. The deckhouse design doesn't lend itself to opening portlights.

Access to the Volvo MD 2040 38-horsepower diesel is quite good. The saildrive comes standard with a fixed prop, although many owners have opted for a folding prop. The engine was quiet and smooth as we motored out of the harbor at more than 6 knots. The fuel tank holds 35 gallons, which just may last all season. Additional tankage includes two 40-gallon water tanks and a 20-gallon waste tank.

The northwest winds were gusty, which gave the 121 an opportunity to show off its impressive acceleration. Sailing close-hauled, the boat had a nice motion as it sliced through the water at close to 8 knots. The helm was nicely balanced and the steering easy. There was no tendency to pound. In winds ranging from 12 to 15 knots, we were consistently sailing above 7 knots. Cracking off onto a close reach, you could feel the quick response as the boat powered up. Although we were sailing fast, the boat was surprisingly easy to handle. The helmsperson can easily trim the headsail from the leeward side. Unfortunately we were not able to fly a spinnaker, but I suspect that the 121 will have good off-the-wind performance as well.

The C&C 121 delivers great sailing performance. It also happens to have a comfortable, well-thought-out and tastefully appointed interior. When you include innovative construction and high-tech materials in the package you realize that the C&C 121 is the logical expression of a storied lineage. 

From Bob Perry / Boats.com

Years ago, a couple of young Canadian designers started a company called Canadian Northern. They produced some very fast boats and, for reasons unknown to me, changed the name of the company by combining their last-name initials so that George Cuthbertson and George Cassian became C&C. Working with a group of Canadian builders C&C gradually grew to be one of the biggest production boat building companies in North America. It pioneered the use of cored laminates and introduced the now universal aluminum toerail. It was responsible for elevating the aesthetics of production yachts in general through the quality of its designs.

Like many builders, C&C ran into hard times during the late 1980s, in part because it lost sight of a defined market target. The boats were no longer racers, but they didn't make the transition to cruising boats gracefully. C&C gradually shut down and was subsequently bought by Fairport Yachts, builders of the Tartan line. Combined with the design efforts of Tim Jacket, the company, still a strong name in the market, appears to be making a comeback.

The new C&C 121 is typical of the historical C&C type: the family club-racer/cruiser. The aesthetics are pure C&C. The cabintrunk is very contoured and sculpted with crisp facets. There are no ports forward of the big fixed windows. This saves the builder money and also reinforces the C&C look. All in all, this is a very handsome boat.

The hull shape features an extremely wide transom. It's too wide for my eye, but this beam aft benefits the cockpit layout and the aft cabin accommodations. Is this shape bad? Or slow? No, I don't think so. Sometimes when you get a boat with too much beam aft the waterlines go quite asymmetrical when the boat heels over giving it a multiple personality, i.e. it's balanced and well-behaved when sailed upright, but a real unbalanced bear when it's heeled. I would think that a designer of Jacket's experience has taken this into consideration. Note how far aft the keel is. This will help. Certainly almost all boats sail better with heel angle minimized.

The rest of the hull shape is really nice. There is a definite "V" to the forefoot and this is carried aft with a 12-degree deadrise angle. This deadrise gradually fairs out as you approach the transom. Starting at station 9 the run is quite flat. The lines plan shows almost a knuckle where this transition from deadrise to flat occurs. With the big wide transom I would be concerned that this transom might slap in some moorage situations. That aside I think this boat will be quite fast. The D/L is a moderate 141. Three keels are available drawing 8 feet; 6 feet, 6 inches; or 5 feet.

This is an amazing interior for a 40-foot boat. There are berths for two couples, a large head with shower stall aft and a well-laid-out galley and nav station. The saloon area features a drop-leaf table and room for at least four people to dine. I like to see a table overlap the seats by 3 inches, but this one looks like it stops short of the settee fronts. Clearance over the aft berth is 30 inches. I wouldn't consider this clearance generous, but it is adequate. The engine is tucked into the box at the foot of the companionway. Note there is counter space on both sides of the range. There is also a lot of locker space in this design.

The rig is normal with an SA/D of 23.16 and an 8-degree sweep to the spreaders. The main overlaps the backstay by about a foot.

It's good to see that the traditions initiated by Cuthbertson and Cassian are being maintained.

Disclaimer

The Company offers the details of this vessel in good faith but cannot guarantee or warrant the accuracy of this information nor warrant the condition of the vessel. A buyer should instruct his agents, or his surveyors, to investigate such details as the buyer desires validated. This vessel is offered subject to prior sale, price change, or withdrawal without notice.

Presented For Sale By:

Eastport Yacht Sales

Eastport Yacht Sales
Annapolis, Maryland, 21403
United States
View Seller Inventory

Contact Seller

X
* We weren't able to post your message, please check the highlighted fields and try again.

Thanks

We have sent your information directly to the seller.

Request cannot be completed

You may have entered incorrect information or the server is temporarily down. Please reload this page and try again later.

Presented For Sale By:

Eastport Yacht Sales

Eastport Yacht Sales
Annapolis, Maryland, 21403
United States
View Seller Inventory

Contact Seller

X
* We weren't able to post your message, please check the highlighted fields and try again.

Thanks

We have sent your information directly to the seller.

Request cannot be completed

You may have entered incorrect information or the server is temporarily down. Please reload this page and try again later.

Advertisement

Get a Shipping Quote

Cheap Boat Transport Services - Save up to 80%

Shipping Estimate: Unavailable
Please request quotes and estimates below:

View Details

Shipping Estimate:Unavailable
Please request quotes and estimates below:

View Details

Services

Advertisement
Advertisement