If you haven’t heard of Savannah Boat Works before don’t feel bad, because this company has only been around for a few years and is still building its dealer network and national footprint. Pay attention to the name, however, because Savannah is on a fast track to becoming a serious player in the boating world. Why? We can sum it up with one sentence: they’re building unique high-quality skiffs with an unusually good fit and finish, and selling them at a competitive price.

Savannah SS19 Center Console Boat


Savannah’s smaller offering is the SS19, a self-bailing center console skiff boat that can handle up to 140 horses on the transom but gets by just fine with 90 horsepower. It’s roomier than most skiffs of a similar length because it has a full 8’6” beam, and also can handle a higher number of passengers than one would expect (it’s rated for up to 10). Like most boats of this nature it has a relatively simply layout, with an open stern capped off by an aft deck, a leaning post and center console, and a bow cockpit. Unlike most skiffs, however, the SS19 also has molded-in forward seating in the bow along with drop-in backrests. There’s also an elevated bow casting deck forward of the seats.

2021 Savannah SS19 Center Console Skiff

Above: A 2021 Savannah SS19 Center Console Skiff for sale on boats.com. Photo by Savannah Boatworks / United Marine in Myrtle Beach, SC.



As we noted earlier, these boats are particularly well-finished for skiffs. The boat’s fully linered, cleats are stainless-steel pull-ups, switches are lighted rockers, and rodholders are stainless-steel gunwale flush-mounts. Options for jazzing things up include a ski tow bar, cushions for the forward and aft decks, trolling motor pre-wiring, and swapping the stock swing-back cooler seat for a leaning post with rocket launchers.

From a bow-on view these skiffs look a bit unusual, due to the way they carry their beam far forward up to a rounded nose with an angled surface above the moderate-V entry. The running surface carries its V-shape back to a 15-degree transom deadrise, which is fairly aggressive for a skiff-style boat, and there’s some flare in the bow to knock down spray. Put these characteristics together and you get a smoother, drier ride than simple flat-bottom skiffs can provide.

Specifications:
LOA – 19’6”
Beam – 8’6”
Draft (min) – 9”
Displacement – 2,160 lbs.
Transom Deadrise – 15 degrees
Passenger Capacity – 10
Fuel Capacity –32 gal.

Savannah SS21


The 21-footer is Savannah’s larger model, and can be had in stock form, with multiple options, or in their “Platinum” edition with all the bells and whistles and then some. It adds in a full electronics package, upgraded stereo system, foam deck padding, and a hard top with integrated lights, stereo speakers, electronics box, rocket launchers, and even an elevated tow-bit for the watersports lovers. The larger model also comes stock with the leaning post as opposed to a cooler seat, and there’s room in the bow for a removable pedestal cocktail table.

Savannah Hybrid Skiff SS21

Above: A 2021 Savannah Hybrid Skiff SS21 for sale on boats.com. Photo by Rogue Motion in Charleston, SC.



Otherwise, setting aside the size difference the boat remains much the same as its smaller sibling. Hull design and the basic deck layout are identical, as is the high-end finish level. The real draw for up-sizing the boat will be for better seakeeping abilities, and easier fishing with a crowd. Standing on the deck it felt to us like fishing with four or even five anglers wouldn’t feel cramped in the least.

Specifications:
LOA – 21’4”
Beam – 8’6”
Draft (min) – 9”
Displacement – 2,380
Transom Deadrise – 15 degrees
Passenger Capacity – 10
Fuel Capacity –32 gal.

While the Savannahs are higher-end than many boats we commonly call skiffs, they will naturally be stacked up against competitors like Carolina Skiff, Sundance Boats and KenCraft Bay Riders. The Savannahs maintain the shallow draft fishability, stability, open layout, and easy maintenance that are the trademarks of this genre of boat. But between the unusual hull design and the topsides layout incorporating front seating, they may well hold additional appeal to family anglers and people who enjoy waterborne activities that go beyond fishing.

Pulling the kids around on tow-toys, enjoying lunch on the hook, or driving the boat up to a remote sand spit for some time on a private beach could all be in the cards with these boats. So while the Savannah SS19 and SS21 certainly are skiffs, they differentiate themselves from the crowd — and there’s a good chance we’ll be hearing a lot more about them in the future.

See Savannah SS19 and SS21 boats for sale today on boats.com.

Written by: Lenny Rudow
With over two decades of experience in marine journalism, Lenny Rudow has contributed to publications including YachtWorld, boats.com, Boating Magazine, Marlin Magazine, Boating World, Saltwater Sportsman, Texas Fish & Game, and many others. Lenny is a graduate of the Westlawn School of Yacht Design, and he has won numerous BWI and OWAA writing awards.
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