Needing to replace its older 31-foot model, Finngulf Yachts of Finland went to Florida-based Häkän Södergren for a new design. The result is the Finngulf 335. As far as category goes, this boat would be a family cruiser with an emphasis on performance. It's a design that will go head to head with the popular French models, as well as Catalinas and Sabres. It's a nice all-around boat that you could race PHRF or take for a three-week summer cruise.

The Finngulf 335.

The Finngulf 335.

Advertisement



We have a handsome boat here that shows short overhangs, plenty of beam and a canoe body with minimal rocker. The D/L is 165. The keel is a fin with bulb, and the rudder is a deep, partially balanced spade. I think the beam carried aft like this is probably an attempt to get usable volume aft for accommodations, but I can't see any reason that this boat should not be a fast sailer. The bow sections are certainly fuller than current hot IMS-style designs, but this also lends itself to more accommodations.

It's a clever interior with a double berth tucked under the cockpit in almost stateroomlike luxury. The V-berth forward is snug but adequate. The stretched-out galley may not be in fashion today, but in this case it is the best arrangement. To my eye the icebox looks too small, but the rest of the galley has good stowage space and enough counter space.

Once again this arrangement is dependent upon the companionway being notched into the back of the cabintrunk. This clears the area aft of the companionway for inclusion into the aft cabin. The headroom will disappear once you get to the mast, and this looks to me like it will have impact on the headroom at the sinks. Being the cook in my family, I require headroom in only two places on board, the stove and the sinks. I would rather sit down than try to compress my 6 feet, 3 inches into 6 feet, 2 inches of headroom. In my own design work, I find that if I size interior components to fit my own body, they will work for almost everybody, with a feeling of room to spare.

The SA/D of this design is 22. This includes a 90-percent, self-tacking jib and a main with some roach overlap on the backstay. Note the convenient way this rig lends itself to having the mainsheet traveler mounted on the transom. The jib leads to a stretch of traveler track that extends beyond the edges of the cabintrunk and is anchored to tubular frames port and starboard. This gives the self-tacking jib the range to be effective to a sheeting angle of 13 degrees. The roller furling drum of the jib is partially buried in the foredeck. There is also a deep well for anchor line. Note the bow extension for tacking the asymmetrical chute. This rig will get by without running backs because the spreaders have been swept aft 19 degrees.

Boat Specifications

LOA33'2";
LWL29'7";
Beam11'1";
Draft5'5";
Displacement9,614 lbs.;
Ballast3,740 lbs.;
Sail Area622 sq. ft.;
SA/D22;
D/L165;
L/B3.06;
Auxiliary18-horsepower Volvo 2020;
Fuel15.4 gals.;
Water33 gals.

SAILINGlogo-115This story originally appeared in Sailing Magazine, and is republished here by permission. Subscribe to Sailing.

 

 

 

 

Advertisement