Here is Freedom's first Pedrick design. It is a trim 35-footer that has the famous Freedom freestanding rig and other design features that will appeal to veteran and beginner cruisers.

The Freedom 35 under sail.

The Freedom 35 under sail.

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Let's start with the interior layout. The Freedom 35 uses its volume to great advantage and gives us an interior layout that you wouldn't have found in 40-footers 20 years ago. The aft cabin uses an athwartships double berth tucked under the cockpit sole. The head is spacious and includes a shower stall with a nifty wet locker space outboard. The galley is a bit small but there has to be some sacrifice when you put two private sleeping areas into a 35-footer. The nav station faces aft and uses the starboard settee for the seat. The dinning table stows neatly out of the way on the forward bulkhead to open up the main cabin. The V-berth area is large and converts to a double berth. Note that the engine is located amidships under the galley counter and settee seat. There is little more you could ask from the layout of a 35-footer.

The hull form features 12-foot beam and a broad stern. The overhands are moderate by today's standards, but there is enough overhang to give the hull profile some grace. The sheerline is attractive and blends well with the conventional cabintrunk. The D/L is 239. There are two keels available. The deep keel draws 6.5 feet and uses the whale tail profile. The shoal keel draws 4.5 feet and uses wings to gain upwind performance. The rudder is a partially balanced spade with a whale tail tip.

We have seen the Freedom rigs go through a slow evolution since the early days of the Freedom cat ketches. The smaller boats work better with a single spar. It is significant that the foretriangle has been getting larger on the later models. This Pedrick design can no longer be called a cat anything. Its foretriangle approaches that of many fractional rigged boats. The benefit in this bigger foretriangle is increased speed upwind and larger spinnakers for better off the wind speed. With the small self-tacking jib and big main, you are looking at hands-off beating in this boat. The SA/D is 20.09. This SA/D should give the new 35 enough horsepower to be a good all-round performer.

The cockpit of the 35 opens to the transom swim step for the ultimate in cruising convenience. The T-shaped cockpit uses a low coaming aft for the helmsman and then raises the coamings forward for better security. The Freedom rig allows for a very clear deck. There appear to be genoas drawn in on the sail plan, and I do see genoa tracks on the deck plan. This would add a new level of performance to the Freedom line by allowing the shifting of gears when the wind turns light by the use of conventional overlapping headsails. There is a recessed anchor well forward.

The Freedom line offers sailors a sensible alternative to the standard sloop rig. As the technology of composite spar, and experience with more performance-oriented Freedom-style rigs increases, it will be fun to keep track of the evolution of this line of clever yachts.

Boat Specifications

LOA35.35'
LWL29.88'
Beam12'
DraftDeep 6.5' Wing 4.5'
Displacement14611 lbs.
Ballast4465 lbs.
Sail Area740 sq. ft.
SA/D20.09
D/L239
AuxiliaryPerkins M-30 30 hp
Fuel35 gals.
Water70 gals.

 

SAILINGlogo-115This story originally appeared in Sailing Magazine, and is republished here by permission. Subscribe to Sailing.

 

 

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